Muscular Dystrophies and Aging: The Facts

Created Saturday 09 Nov 2019 Last Updated Saturday 05 Nov 2022

Muscular Dystrophies and Aging: The Facts

Muscular dystrophies (MDs) are a group of genetic diseases that result in progressive muscle weakness and degeneration. They are a group of rare diseases that affect approximately 1 in 5,000 people.

These diseases primarily affect the muscles but can occasionally be found in the eyes, heart, or nervous system as well. The most common muscular dystrophies include:

The Basics of Muscular Dystrophy

MDs are a group of genetic diseases that cause progressive muscle weakness and degeneration. MDs affect approximately one in 5,000 people, and there are approximately 50 different types that exist.

The most common type is Duchenne MD, which affects about 1 in 3,500 boys worldwide. MDs can affect any part of the body, including the eyes, heart, or nervous system.

The most common muscular dystrophies include:

  • Becker MD: Becker MD is the most common MD, affecting about 1 in 40,000 people. It is a degenerative disorder of the muscles that primarily affects the legs, leading to difficulty walking and climbing stairs.
  • Duchenne MD: Duchenne MD is the second-most common disorder and affects about 1 in 15,000 boys worldwide. It is one of the most severe forms of MD and primarily affects the legs, hips, and upper arms.
  • Hemophilia: Hemophilia is a rare disorder that primarily affects the blood. It is caused by a mutation in the gene responsible for clotting
  • Myotonic Dystrophy: Myotonic dystrophy is a rare disorder that primarily affects the muscles and nervous system.
  • Myotonic Muscular Dystrophy: Myotonic muscular dystrophy is a rare disorder that primarily affects the muscles and nervous system.

Genetic Counseling and MDs

Many types of MDs are inherited in an autosomal dominant manner, meaning that one copy of the gene will be sufficient to affect the individual.

This means that some forms of MDs are diseases that are passed down within families. Most forms of MDs are genetic disorders that are caused by a mutation in a gene that is responsible for building proteins in the body. As these proteins degrade over time, the muscles become weaker and less functional.

Not all individuals with a mutation in a disease-associated gene will develop the disease. In some cases, the person’s environment may also play a role in the development of MDs.

Risk Factors for Muscular Dystrophy

Many types of MDs occur as rare genetic disorders that are random events and are not hereditary. In these cases, a parent may not have any indication that they are a carrier of the disease.

Other types of MDs do occur as hereditary disorders that are passed down through families. The parents may have been tested to see if they carry the mutation.

In some cases, an individual may be a carrier of a disease-associated gene mutation but not experience any symptoms, in other cases, an individual may be a carrier of a disease-associated gene mutation but never experience any symptoms.

In rare circumstances, an individual may not be a carrier of a disease-associated gene mutation but still experience the symptoms of the disease.

Prognosis of Muscular Dystrophy

The prognosis of MDs is highly variable, as each disease affects different individuals in different ways.

Some individuals may experience mild symptoms that do not interfere with their lives, while others may experience debilitating symptoms that significantly affect their quality of life.

There is currently no cure for MDs, but there are several treatment options available that can slow the progression of symptoms, improve quality of life, and extend lifespan.

Treatment Options for MDs

There are several treatment options available for MDs that can improve quality of life and slow the progression of symptoms.

  • Physical therapy is one treatment option that can help patients with MDs maintain their mobility, strength, and ability to perform daily tasks.
  • Occupational therapy is another common treatment option that can help individuals with MDs perform daily tasks and manage pain.
  • Pain management is a common treatment that can reduce symptoms of pain and discomfort caused by MDs.
  • Swimming is a great exercise option for individuals with MDs that can reduce pain and improve mobility.
  • Wearing compression garments can also be helpful for individuals with MDs by improving circulation and increasing mobility.
  • Assistive devices can be used to help individuals with MDs lift, push, and pull objects.
  • In some cases, surgical procedures may be used to treat MDs by correcting joint deformities and removing pressure from joints.

Conclusion

Muscular dystrophies are a group of rare, genetic disorders that primarily affect the muscles.

They are a group of degenerative disorders that result in progressive weakness and muscle degeneration.

There are approximately 50 different types of MDs, and the most common types include Duchenne MD, Becker MD, and Hemophilia. There are several treatment options available for MDs, including physical therapy, occupational therapy, pain management, swimming, wearing compression garments, and using assistive devices.

There is currently no cure for MDs, but these treatments can help improve quality of life and slow the progression of symptoms.

Back to blog

Leave a comment

Please note, comments need to be approved before they are published.